Clock Peddler Project, Part 1

This post is the first in a series of three that will take you through the steps I took to produce a carving of an old-time clock peddler. (Part 2, Part 3) My cousin is a clock collector. He also repairs and re-conditions clocks. When I visited him and his wife in May of this year, he showed a cast figure to me. It appeared to be a copy of an original woodcarving. He asked if I would be interested in reproducing it in wood. As you will see the figure was very interesting and well done. Thinking since it was carved from wood originally, I said yes. He offered a rough slab of basswood that was at least 20 years old. I did some quick measuring and decided it would work.

During the carving I became more and more skeptical of the original method used to make my model. I am now convinced it was never carved from wood but fashioned from clay and cleverly made to look like wood. The fine details, such as the threads in the stockings, the flowers decorating the back-board holding the clocks and the fine details in the clocks, including the roman numerals could not have been added by carving into wood. The original artist is not identified but I would welcome any information dealing with the origin of this model. I did my best to reproduce the figure and used artistic license to deal with some details that required magical powers I do not possess.

This post will cover the preparation of the wood, including surfacing, trimming  and adding scrap pieces to accommodate the pattern. It will also show making the pattern, applying the pattern and cutting the blank on the band saw.
The second post will show many photos taken during the carving progression.  The third and final post will show the completed carving, both without and with the stain.

Clock Peddler Project, Part 2

This is the second of three posts showing a carving I made of an old-time clock peddler. (Part 1, Part 3) Here you will see many photos taken of the project as it evolved into a finished carving. I also show a picture of my tools and my carving bench. the project is mounted on a carving arm and held in place with a carving screw. My carving tools are designed for use with a mallet but only the very early stages required the mallet to remove larger amounts of wood. The remainder of the cuts were done by simply pushing the tools. You will also see a measuring device used to transfer dimensions from the model to the project. The first picture shows my mallet, a carving screw, two dividers, a carving arm and a plastic scale.

Clock Peddler Project, Part 3

This is the last of a three-part series of posts to document my project to carve a clock peddler in basswood. (Part 1, Part 2) These are pictures of the completed carving. you may notice the finished base is smaller than the project as it’s seen attached to the carving arm. When I applied the pattern to the wood I allowed extra stock on the base to accommodate the carving screw. After removing the screw, I trimmed the base. I’m including shots before the stain was applied because the shadows on the raw wood give a different perception to the details. The stain I used is from Germany and was developed for basswood carvings. The color is Pearwood. It is a water based stain that contains wax and ammonia in addition to the pigment. It’s applied with a brush and buffed with a special brush and cloth. The carving is 13 3/4 inches (34.9 cm) tall, 5 1/4 inches (13.3 cm) wide and 4 3/4 inches (12 cm) deep.